G8 St Petersburg Fight Against Infectious Diseases: Statement

Sectors : General health and health funding, HIV/AIDS, Health systems, medicines and regulation, Health and technology, International partnerships and support for Pan-African institutions, Other Preventable Diseases, Polio, Malaria, TB
Organisation : G8
Date made: 
2006

Commitments in: Health - General health and health funding

"14. We pledge our continued support to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the WHO, the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund), the World Bank and other organizations, initiatives and partnerships actively working to fight these diseases.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - Health systems, medicines and regulation

"…2. we, the G8 Leaders, are determined to achieve tangible progress in the following areas: improved international cooperation on the surveillance and monitoring of infectious diseases, including better coordination between the animal and human health communities, building laboratory capacities, and full transparency by all nations in sharing, on a timely basis, virus samples in accordance with national and international regulations and conventions, and other relevant information about the outbreaks of diseases; intensification of scientific research and exchanges in the area of infectious diseases, with a special attention given to involving scientists from developing countries in international scientific research programs… improved access to prevention and treatment of diseases for those in need, through assistance programs focused on strengthening the capacity of health systems and the training, deployment, and retention of qualified health workers; and through innovative clinical research programs, private-public partnerships, and other innovative mechanisms; support for efforts by work with relevant international organizations to mitigate the health consequences of emergencies, including natural and man-made disasters, including through better coordination and capacity building…

…6. …we will aim to increase scientific cooperation with developing countries, encourage partnerships between experts and laboratories of developing and developed countries, and increase the scientific potential in countries of all income levels…

…33. We agree to continue to support efforts by developing country partners, particularly in Africa, to ensure that initiatives to reduce the burden of disease are built on sustainable health systems. We will also continue to emphasize the training, deployment and retention of health workers in our health sector assistance programs…

…34. In order to stimulate active involvement of the pharmaceutical industry, we are committed to strengthening cooperation with regulatory authorities in developing countries and to working with them on identifying appropriate standards and pathways for swift regulatory approval of new prevention and treatment methods.”

Scope: 
International

“19. We reaffirm our partnership with African nations and with the African Union, and will continue to work with them to deliver on the goals of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), to improve health systems overall and to fight infectious diseases”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - Other Preventable Diseases

“30. We will assist the Global Measles Partnership and encourage the WHO to continue to implement its plans on measles prevention and elimination, as mandated by the World Health Assembly in 2004, and to propose measures donors and national governments should take to reach and maintain a high level of immunity to measles.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - Polio

“27. We urgently call for mobilization of financial support and will continue to work collectively and with bilateral and multilateral donors to close the funding gap for 2007-2008, and will continue to work with others towards securing the resources necessary to finish the program and declare our planet polio-free in the near future.

28. The existing polio monitoring network is a valuable resource. We will work with other donors and stakeholders to maintain this network after polio has been eradicated, with a view to supporting other public health objectives, in particular those related to disease monitoring.”

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - Malaria

“24. …we: reaffirm our commitment to work with African countries to scale up malaria control interventions, reduce the burden of the disease, and eventually defeat malaria on the continent and meet the Abuja target of halving the burden of malaria by 2010 agree to strengthen malaria control activities and programs in African countries with the objective of achieving significant public health impact; will collaborate with governments, private sector companies and non-governmental organizations in public-private partnerships to expand malaria interventions and programs; support the development of new, safe, and effective drugs, creation of a vaccine, and promotion of the widest possible availability of prevention and treatment to people in need; welcome efforts in the framework of the "Roll Back Malaria Partnership" and support activities of public and private entities to save children from the disease."

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - TB

"…21. We reaffirm the commitment we made at the Genoa Summit in 2001 to halt the spread of this disease. We will also support the Global Plan to Stop TB, 2006-2015, which aims to cut TB deaths in half by the year 2015 compared to 1990 levels, saving some 14 million lives over ten years, and call upon all donors and stakeholders to contribute to its effective implementation."

Scope: 
International

Commitments in: Health - HIV/AIDS

"…14. We pledge our continued support to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the WHO, the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund), the World Bank and other organizations, initiatives and partnerships actively working to fight these diseases.

15...We remain committed to halting and reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS, as called for in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and to the objectives outlined in the Gleneagles Summit Communiqué, and the call in the United Nations General Assembly Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS of June 2006 for scaling up significantly towards the goal of universal access to comprehensive prevention programs, treatment, care and support by 2010…

…17. we will adhere to the following principles: further promotion of a comprehensive and well-balanced approach to tackling HIV/AIDS, which includes prevention, treatment and care; continued involvement of all relevant partners, including civil society, the private sector and people living with HIV/AIDS, in the activities to tackle the HIV/AIDS pandemic and to reduce stigma and discrimination against people with this disease; scale up support to address the rising rates of HIV infection among young people, particularly young girls and women; supporting the continued implementation of comprehensive, evidence-based strategies of prevention, and the development of new and innovative methods of prevention, such as microbicides, and vaccines against the diseases that increase the risk of “15...We remain committed to halting and reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS, as called for in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and to the objectives outlined in the Gleneagles Summit Communiqué, and the call in the United Nations General Assembly Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS of June 2006 for scaling up significantly towards the goal of universal access to comprehensive prevention programs, treatment, care and support by 2010…

…17. we will adhere to the following principles: further promotion of a comprehensive and well-balanced approach to tackling HIV/AIDS, which includes prevention, treatment and care; continued involvement of all relevant partners, including civil society, the private sector and people living with HIV/AIDS, in the activities to tackle the HIV/AIDS pandemic and to reduce stigma and discrimination against people with this disease; scale up support to address the rising rates of HIV infection among young people, particularly young girls and women; supporting the continued implementation of comprehensive, evidence-based strategies of prevention, and the development of new and innovative methods of prevention, such as microbicides, and vaccines against the diseases that increase the risk of HIV transmission; facilitating access to prevention, treatment and care for the most vulnerable segments of the population; building the capacity of health care systems in poor countries through recruitment, training and deployment of public and private health workers; and raising public awareness of the existing threat in all countries affected.

18 …We will work with other donors and stakeholders in the effort to secure funds needed for the 2006-2007 replenishment period and call upon all concerned to participate actively in the development of a four-year strategy, aimed at building a solid foundation for the activities of the Fund in the years ahead. The G8 members will work with governments and technical agencies to support the preparation of high quality, timely proposals for Global Fund AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria grants…

… 20. We remain committed to our Sea Island Summit initiative on creation of a Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, and reaffirm our determination to bring it to fruition…”

Scope: 
International